Paris, Texas (Wim Wenders – 1984) A-

It was not what I expected at all. I did not really know what to expect. I knew this was a classic of cinema and highly regarded. Written by the late great Sam Shephard, directed by the German auteur Wim Wenders and featuring the late (and also great) Harry Dean Stanton. I thought for some reason it would be at least set in Paris, Texas. Maybe an outlaw story of sorts. Well, it definitely it is not. It’s set mostly in Los Angeles, on the road, and in Houston (cool to recognize some sights from H-town). It’s about a man who was lost for a while until he literally walks out of the desert and gets taken back to his family by his brother. He speaks not at all at first then very little. He has a son who is being raised by his brother and his wife. He barely knows him and the son feels the same way. The emotional pull of this tale is around the background story of our leading man, Travis, and his new purpose to atone for his previous mistakes. He wants his son to reunite with his mother and sets on a road trip to do so. It’s a movie that I felt I am losing interest in at times but it kept pulling me back until I absolutely loved it when Travis has one of the most amazing monologues in movie history with his wife. That heart-breaking scene fills in the blanks of what the hell happened between them two. Paris, Texas is not a movie for everyone. It’s not easy to love I think. For me it stuck and I find myself thinking about it often. It is a fable of a broken life and the small attempts of the man who is trying to piece some of it together regardless if he will remain a part of it or not.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s